• Achievement Test – A standardized test used to measure acquired knowledge or skills in a specific subject area (such as mathematics, reading, or science).
    • Aggregate – All students in a district, school, or grade
    • Anchor Paper – A student work sample identified for the purpose of exemplifying a specific level or score on a criterion‐based rubric. Typically, one‐two anchor papers are selected for each rubric
    • Authentic Assessment – A strategy for assessment in which students are asked to perform engaging, real‐world tasks that demonstrate meaningful application of essential knowledge and
    • AYP – Adequate Yearly Progress. A measurement defined by the United States federal Every Student Succeeds Act that allows the U.S. Department of Education to determine how every public school and the school district in the country is performing academically according to results on standardized tests.
    • Benchmark Assessment – A form of assessment most often developed within a school district and administered to students at specific intervals of the school year. The assessments serve several purposes: providing evaluative information about the impact of a curriculum or a program, offering instructional information that helps diagnose student strengths and weaknesses, and informing and guiding teachers’ instructional
    • CBM (Curriculum Based Measures) and CBA (Curriculum Based Assessment) – An assessment method used to determine the extent to which students are progressing in basic academic areas such as math, reading, writing, and
    • CogAT - The Cognitive Abilities Test is a group-administered K–12 assessment intended to estimate students' learned reasoning and problem-solving abilities through a battery of verbal, quantitative, and nonverbal test items. It is commonly used to measure giftedness in a variety of domains.
    • Cohort – A group of students with a common defining characteristic, most often grade level.
    • Common Assessment – An assessment typically created collaboratively by a team of teachers responsible for the same grade or subject area and administered across student groups or
    • Constructed Response – A problem or question item that requires the respondent to compose an answer rather than select from a list of choices. Essays, short answer, project
    • Criterion‐Referenced – An assessment where an individual's performance is compared to a specific learning objective or performance standard and not to the performance of other The ISAT by Smarter Balanced is an example of a criterion-referenced assessment.
    • Curriculum‐Embedded – Assessment that occurs simultaneously with learning in the classroom If properly designed, students should not be able to tell whether they are being taught or assessed.
    • Diagnostic Assessment ‐ Assessment that provides the teacher with an understanding of the prior knowledge and skills of students, as well as the strengths and specific learning needs of an individual or groups of students in relation to the expectations that will be
    • EOCA - End of Course Assessment – Tests designed by the teachers of the Coeur d’Alene School District to measure academic achievement in each course. These exams are usually provided at the end of each academic term and are weighted at 15% of the students’ academic grade unless it is the first time that the assessment is given, at which time it will have a 10% weight. (Board procedure 2620P)
    • Formative Assessment – Non‐graded assessment of student learning that a teacher uses to inform Formative assessment is often described as “assessment for learning.”
    • IRI - Idaho Reading Indicator – Provided individually to students in the primary grades (KG-03) three times a year to ensure that all children in the State of Idaho will master the skills they need to become successful readers. Computer adaptive assessments in vocabulary, reading fluency, comprehension, and additional indicators of early reading strength are provided.
    • ISAT - Idaho Standard Achievement Test. Administered to all Idaho students in grades 3-8 and 10 to provide ongoing monitoring of individual, school, district, and state progress. Content areas assessed are English language arts/literacy, mathematics, and science.
    • KGR – Kindergarten Readiness Assessment. This assessment is usually given to students before entering Kindergarten and includes letter name and letter sound identification, writing, and basic shape/image identification.
    • Learning Assessment - Learning is designed and facilitated to use multiple sources of data to assess learning, including self-monitoring, assessment design, data collection, data use, and feedback.
    • LNF - Letter Naming Fluency (LNF) - identified frequently as the best single indicator of risk for reading failure and requires saying the correct letter name.
    • LSF - Letter Sound Fluency - predictive of a later ability to read the sounds in a word that requires saying the correct sound of a letter.
    • Norm-Referenced - A type of assessment designed to compare and rank test takers in relation to one another. NWEA MAP Growth assessments are an example of a norm-referenced assessment.
    • ORF – Oral Reading Fluency. Grade-level reading passages. Students read three similar passages written at an end of the year reading level and the passages are the same exact passages each time
    • Performance‐Based Assessment – An alternative to traditional testing that requires a student to create an answer or product that demonstrates his or her understanding of the
    • Portfolio Assessment – A purposeful collection of student work that demonstrates the student’s learning, development, and achievement over Often the portfolio includes written student reflections and rubrics used to “score” work.
    • Progress Monitoring – The National Center for Student Progress Monitoring defines progress monitoring as, “a scientifically based practice that is used to assess students’ academic performance and evaluate the effectiveness of ”
    • PSAT - Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test. An exam given to high school freshmen, sophomores and juniors which measures critical reading, mathematics, and writing in preparation for the SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test)
    • Quests – Common formative assessments and performance that will be designed by district staff to demonstrate progress toward meeting standards or Portrait of a Graduate dispositions.
    • Rubric – A scoring tool that lists criteria against which a student work sample is
    • SAT – Scholastic Aptitude Test. A test of a student's academic skills in critical reading, mathematics, and writing, used for admission to US colleges.
    • SBAC – Smarter Balanced Assessment (Consortium). A multistate collaboration to create assessments of the Common Core State Standards in English language arts/literacy, science, and social studies as well as mathematics.
    • Standardized Test – Tests that are designed, administered, and scored in a consistent ISAT by Smarter-Balanced and WIDA-ACCESS 2.0 are considered examples of standardized tests.
    • Stanine – Short for “Standard Nine,” stanine refers to a method of scaling scores along a nine‐point (often nationally normed) standard scale. A stanine 5 is considered average nationally.
    • Summative Assessment – Graded assessment of student learning that demonstrates whether or not a student has met expectations. Summative assessment is often described as an “assessment of learning.” End-of-course assessments are examples of summative assessments.
    • Universal Screening – A quick, simple assessment of specific skills used for early identification of students who might be struggling. Universal screenings can be administered one or more times
    • WIDA – Originating from the states of Wisconsin, Delaware and Arkansas, this assessment measures academic language, listening & reading, speaking & writing for students whose first language is not English.